Kamala Harris’s Ascent Doesn’t Mean Progress for Black Women



Despite everything we do and accomplish, Malcolm X’s words still ring true:“The most disrespected person in America is the Black woman.”


© Steve Prezant
Despite everything we do and accomplish, Malcolm X’s words still ring true:“The most disrespected person in America is the Black woman.”

As a Black woman, I take immense pride in Vice President Kamala Harris’s victory. I beamed as she took her oath of office in a stunning purple dress and coat—a nod to unity and Shirley Chisholm>>>P, the first Black woman to run for president. I felt like I was watching the best of what this nation has to offer. But I am also reticent. Being a Black woman means experiencing perpetual whiplash: overwhelming highs and devastating lows before you can even get your bearings.

Right now, Black women seem to be thriving. Across America, they’ve become the most educated demographic and the fastest-growing group of entrepreneurs>>>P. With every election cycle, we’re reminded of their power: Black women organizers were pivotal to Joe Biden’s

Read More