Hip retro fashions found at Calistoga’s Mad Mod Shop | News

Shopkeeper and designer Andrea DeTrinidad-Hoogendoorn — aka the mad dressmaker — is crazy for retro-inspired garments and accessories. Since 2018, she’s owned and operated the Mad Mod Shop in downtown Calistoga, offering locals and tourists an opportunity to access stylish, hand-made items not available in department stores or online retailers.

“We provide an alternative to what’s typically out there,” DeTrinidad-Hoogendoorn said. “I’ve designed and hand-sewn many of these items myself or have searched to find unique designers, either locally or from around the world.”

Finding inspiration

Growing up, DeTrinidad-Hoogendoorn lived with her mother, a ranger at Armstrong Redwoods State Natural Reserve in Sonoma County, and spent every other weekend with her father, a crane operator and volunteer firefighter in San Francisco.

“I spent a lot of time in the redwoods pretending to be a fairy,” she said, “but I also spent a lot of time in the city,

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Shop Makes, Sells Clothes for Baltimore’s Top Public Schools | Maryland News

By JACQUES KELLY, The Baltimore Sun

BALTIMORE (AP) — There’s a Baltimore destination that goes one better than the phrase “shop local” — Herman’s Discount in Waverly. At this quirky emporium, what many shoppers carry home has a Baltimore edge to it.

This Greenmount Avenue shop is the go-to place for highly specific school shirts and caps. The crucial uniform components for many Baltimore City Schools students are embroidered upstairs, above a main floor that spreads out like an eclectic shopping bazaar.

“Outerwear is a huge part of kids’ fashions,” said the owner, Ricky Ralph Herman. “It’s our job to make it cool, so they’ll want to wear them.”

Making a school uniform appealing might seem like an uphill assignment. Herman’s job is to take knit polo or button down Oxford shirts and blouses, generally made overseas, and imprint or embroider a local school brand on them.

Political Cartoons

To

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Resale runs in the family at Underground Fashion Exchange | Local News






Underground Fashion Exchange

Jennifer Lackman has opened the Underground Fashion Exchange in the basement of Western Pawnbrokers.




Lackman’s clothing collection has been sourced from her own wardrobe, as well as her daughter’s clothing from the past five years. She has also hits estate and garage sales, auctions and thrift stores, looking for quality clothing to resell with a focus on brands like Levi’s, Carhart, Pendleton, and designer jeans, as well as unique and one-of-a-kind finds in the used bins.

“It’s important to me,” said Lackman. “There’s too much stuff in the world. When you go all over the world and you live in Seoul … what they have to do with their garbage and how it’s separated. That’s their law, you don’t get a chance to just throw things away. I just want to recycle everything.”

“Fast fashion” has become one of the world’s largest producers of waste, and

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How Trump’s Trade War Built China’s First Global Fashion Giant | BoF Professional, News & Analysis

On May 17, Shein — pronounced “she-in” — ended Amazon’s 152-day streak as the most downloaded shopping app in the US, a remarkable feat for any seven-year-old clothing brand, let alone one most Americans over 30 still haven’t heard of.

The kids, though, are all over it. As with so many online phenomena, Gen-Z and young Millennial shoppers have propelled Shein’s rise, in thrall to the company’s never-ending, always-changing catalogue of clothes at prices that stretch even the most meagre allowance. One recent Thursday, the app debuted 6,239 new items, including a floral backless halter top ($5), purple dinosaur-print PJs ($10), and a prom-perfect fitted butterfly-sleeve dress with pearl trim ($22). Earlier this year, a UK blogger crowed that she’d paid just £100 for more than 30 Shein bikinis, a clearly impractical number of swimsuits until you remember that social media audiences demand novelty above all.

Anything you want at

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