Boycott Boohoo, or Hunt for Bargains? What Will Consumers Do?

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LONDON — After a rough few weeks, Boohoo’s share price is bouncing back, but the question remains whether its young consumer base will keep buying from the brand, which has been dogged by allegations of poor labor practices and unfair pay at one of its supplier’s factories in Leicester, England.

It remains to be seen whether the scandal will bring forth any meaningful change, or encourage consumers to stop before they shop, and think about the clothing brand, or retailer’s, ethics. Or will the controversy just be forgotten in a few months’ time, with boohoo.com’s young clientele once again turning to the retailer for cheap alternatives to the trends they spot on social media?

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Recent history has shown that shoppers have short memories, and often return to fast-fashion sites because they can’t resist the social media buzz —

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Half of Brits say they can’t stop online shopping in lockdown

Brits are turning to online shopping to boost their mood and fill their time during lockdown. Photo: Tim Goode/PA Wire/PA Images
Brits are turning to online shopping to boost their mood and fill their time during lockdown. Photo: Tim Goode/PA Wire/PA Images

With after-work drinks cancelled and weekend brunches postponed, Brits have turned to online shopping to fill their time and give themselves something to do.

In a survey of 1,500 UK adults by price comparison site Idealo, nearly half (48%) of Brits said online shopping has made them feel happier during the COVID-19 lockdown, with almost a third (31%) admitting to making a purchase every single week.

What’s more, nearly half said they have become “obsessed” with buying things online since lockdown began on 21 March, while 39% admitted to buying something they “wouldn’t normally buy.”

READ MORE: Coronavirus — Top tips to save when shopping online in lockdown

A third of those surveyed said they have been buying items for their home, with home and garden being the most

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Fashion vs. the Economy: Retail Faces Double Dip

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The economic roller coaster isn’t over — and fashion can just hold on as tight as possible. 

As horrible as the first phase of the coronavirus crisis was, it was relatively straightforward (and straight down). Almost everybody was forced to shut down and go home, leading a projected contraction of more than 30 percent in second-quarter gross domestic product and an unemployment rate of more than 11 percent. 

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Even though the initial shock passed, that sinking feeling hasn’t gone away. No one knows what’s coming next. For retailers and brands, that means adjusting their business models and conserving cash, fingers-crossed they make it to the other side of the open-ended economic crisis. 

The coronavirus is the driving force behind the chaos, but it’s not the only variable. The reactions to the pandemic on the part of federal policy makers,

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Fast-Fashion Retailer Quiz Launches Probe Into Leicester Factory

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LONDON — Yet another British fast-fashion retailer, Quiz, has launched a probe into one of its factories in Leicester, England, a city that is quickly making a name as the country’s sweatshop capital.

Quiz, which is headquartered in Glasgow, Scotland, and is quoted on the London Stock Exchange, said Monday it is investigating “an alleged instance of non-compliance with national living wage requirements” in a factory that makes some of its products.

It has also cut ties with the supplier working with the factory in Leicester, a city that remains in lockdown due to a spike in the number of COVID-19 cases.

Shares in Quiz, which were down 5 percent at 6.41 pounds in late-morning trading on Monday, closed up 3.2 percent at 6.97 pounds.

The investigation follows an undercover sting published by The Times of London on Saturday, which revealed that workers

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